A Girl, a Whale, and a Song

42AEFFFC-CB18-45F1-BBF8-6D4F771C55FAIris is a twelve year old girl who loves fixing radios. She is also Deaf and living in a family that doesn’t always quite get her. When she hears about a whale who is also having trouble finding connection, she sets out on an incredible journey. Song for a Whale is a book for anyone who wants to be heard, wants to know they are not alone, and loves to read about the amazing world of animals and the power of human connection.

Lynne Kelly answered some questions for me to celebrate Song for a Whale on its book birthday!

Christine: Poetry is a huge thread in this novel. Do you mind talking a little bit about how sign poems work in American Sign Lanugage? We hear a bit in the book, but I’d love to hear more. I love the richness of literature that pulls in other genres. This book has science and fiction and poetry, amazing!

Lynne: Yes, Deaf poets create some lovely work! I decided to include the poetry in the story to illustrate the versatility of American Sign Language.The language that Iris shares with her grandmother is as rich and complex as any other; they can argue, discuss how they feel, tell jokes, and make up stories and poems.

I think too it shows the contrast between these two worlds she’s straddling–here’s something she’s always enjoyed doing with her grandparents.

Here’s an excellent NBC news segment about Deaf poets doing Deaf poetry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRcwVRf5BS8

The last page of the Song For a Whale curriculum guide has more information about Deaf poetry, and a link to linguist and author Clayton Valli’s Dandelions.

Christine: In other interviews you said that Chained (your first novel for children) took three years to write. How long did Song for a Whale take you from inspiration to finished manuscript?

Lynne: For me, it was quick–just over a year from idea to submission-ready. Of course after that there were rounds of revisions, as always. Chained took more research, but mainly it took so long because it was the first book I wrote, so I was learning about writing along the way.

Christine: I don’t want to say too much, but Iris isn’t the only one who takes a journey of transformation. I’ve read in other interviews that you decided to give her grandparents who are Deaf to show the richness of her communication in ASL and her comfort with being Deaf. How did you tap into the grandparent’s journey? Did the characters tell you, or was that kind of loss something you wanted to explore?

Lynne: I knew that I wanted Iris to have some family members who were fluent in sign language, to show that contrast between home and school and the difference between the relationships– naturally, Iris feels more understood and fulfilled when she’s with people who share her language and experience.

But for her to be more compelled to track down the lonely whale she learns about, I wanted things in even the good parts of her life to be not quite right. She wants to get back to the way things used to be with her grandparents, but Grandpa is gone and Grandma isn’t herself anymore, lost in her grief. It’s not something I set out to explore, but I think it ended up making the story more universal; grief is something we all have to experience. We have to work through it and find that though we’ll always miss the person we’ve lost, we’ll be okay.

Christine: I recently read an article about writing Deaf literature and who writes it and why. What I found most interesting about the article, and why I love to read outside my experience, is that I had never heard about the ways to write down speech that is signed. How did you decide on using italics and the tags you used in the book?

Lynne: Since ASL isn’t a written or spoken language, authors have used different conventions to indicate signed dialogue. At first I used italics only, but at times it might not have been clear what was signed and what was internal dialogue. My editor, agent, and I discussed some options and the examples in this article by author Laura Brown, and decided to keep the italics to differentiate it from spoken English, but add quotation marks to indicate that the lines are part of a conversation. Also it treats the sign language dialogue like any other, with quotes.

Christine: Thank you so much for answering questions about this brilliant book. To wrap up, any cool whale facts you didn’t get to include you’d love to share?

Lynne: Humpback whale songs get more complex over time, as they make up new patterns and even borrow snippets of songs from other groups of whales. Then they seem to hit a complexity wall and return to more simple melodies. Bowhead whales are called the “jazz musicians of the sea” since they’re constantly improvising new songs. I’d love to know what it all means!


Lynne Kelly has always loved reading, and fell in love with children’s literature all over again when she worked as a special education teacher. Her career as a sign language interpreter has taken her everywhere from classrooms to hospitals to Alaskan cruises. She lives near Houston, Texas with her adorable dog, Holly.FF000E1D-64B4-441A-BFA5-64F1DDB4DD8D

 

 

Winter of the Wolves

a4be6f79-dedd-427b-823c-a19dbf014537(Click image to buy indie!)

Victoria Scott’s new middle grade book, Hear the Wolves, is the perfect thriller to curl up with on a cold night. Not just for kids, this book had me up until the late hours, breathing hard, scared, and rooting for Sloan, a girl left alone in a blizzard in a small town in Alaska. Armed with two guns, only one with bullets that will protect her from wolves and bears, and a few townspeople who stayed behind when the rest of the town went to a nearby city to vote, they will have to find their way to the river. The river is the only way out to the city, and one of them is terribly injured. Blizzard conditions would be enough to make this arduous, days-long journey hard, but there is something else to contend with, wolves. Due to choice of the townspeople themselves, there were too many rabbits last season, and now there are too many wolves, and the rabbits are gone. The wolves are hungry. The humans are now the hunted.

A terrifically terrifying read that will make you think about fear, independence, the environment, and where we all fit into this world. The author’s note at the end is a piercing look into wolves and the stereotypes that surround them and will urge readers young and old to learn more about these majestic animals and think hard about how we often believe we have conquered the wilderness.

Love this book? Read more here:

Fiction for kids and adults

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Nonfiction: Wolf Conservation and Sanctuaries

Bringing wolves back to Isle Royale National Park

W.O.L.F Sanctuary

Saint Francis Wolf Sanctuary

Fierce Friendship

myatibbsMya Tibbs is a nine-year-old full of sprit, which is good because it’s almost Spirit Week, and she and her popular best friend Naomi are ready to win the week full of competition.

But what happens when Mya and Naomi don’t get to be partners? Instead Mya is stuck with Mean Connie Tate, the biggest bully at her school. Will she sneak information to Naomi and her partner to help them win? Or will she learn there might be more to Connie Tate than meets the eye?

A touching, rollicking look at friendship in elementary school. Sometimes the person we think is being mean isn’t. And sometimes when we don’t intend to, we become the mean one. And what do you do then? Fast-paced with a satisfying ending, including someone getting lassoed in the hall, The Magnificent Mya Tibbs will leave you smiling and thinking. Mya’s creator, Crystal Allen, talks with me about Mya, friendship, and her own experiences in elementary school.

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Christine at Book Club Advisor: Thanks for talking with us today, Crystal! Mya Tibbs loves having Naomi as a new best friend. What did you know about Naomi when you began to write her?

Crystal Allen: I knew that Naomi was a beautiful, but bratty, nine-year-old girl.  The more she developed in my mind, the more I began to see her as a child who was the product of beauty pageants that emphasized outward beauty. Continue reading “Fierce Friendship”

My Family is Ruining My Life!

great-wall-of-lucy-wuAt least that’s what Lucy Wu thinks when her family springs the news on her, days from the beginning of sixth grade. Sixth grade was going to be perfect. Her older sister was leaving for college, meaning Lucy was going to get her own room! Basketball on weekends and a great best friend meant a great year-until her parents dropped the news. She would not be getting her own room, yet. Her grandmother had a sister in China who no one knew about. Now that sister is coming to stay with her family, in her room! Lucy uses her furniture to build a wall between her and her great-aunt’s side of the room. They can let her come visit, but Lucy isn’t going to make it easy. To make it worse, she may have to quit basketball so she can go to Chinese School on the weekends with the most annoying girl in school. Laugh and cry along with Lucy as she discovers that sometimes everything going wrong can lead to everything turning out right. A funny, lovely, candid take on life as a sixth grader, when nothing is in your control, and everything is a big deal.

Study Guide from Scholastic

Catch up with author Wendy Shang on her website

If you love Lucy, check out Wendy’s other great middle grade novel:

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A Girl, a Goat-Man, and the Devil

IMG_7041Who should read West of the Moon by Margie Preus: fairy tale lovers, dreamers, adventurers, history junkies, and lovers of strong female characters.

The story: A girl in Norway is sold to a Goat-Man but dreams of going to America. The problem, she won’t go without her sister, who is far behind at her old home. Another problem, the strange girl in the shed won’t let her leave her behind with the Goat-Man. A strange trio of strengths, they set off to the coast, to America, to find their father who has left to make a new life for them. Continue reading “A Girl, a Goat-Man, and the Devil”