Read With Your Tween – Immigration

 


Imagine being taken from your home. Imagine your mother is the one who lets it happen.


This is the fate that befalls the Kelly children. It’s 1856, and their widowed mother has sent them west from New York City because she’s convinced that she can t give them the life they deserve.
The Kellys board an orphan train and are taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where their problems only grow worse. It was bad enough that they had to say goodbye to their mother, but now they re forced to part ways with their fellow siblings as well. Thirteen-year-old Frances won t stand for it. She’s going to protect her brothers and sisters, even if it means dressing up like a boy and putting herself in danger.
Will Frances be able to save her siblings? And what about her mom was splitting up their family really her greatest act of love? Ride the rails with Frances and her siblings to find out
This is as close to a perfect book as you ll buy this year. “VOYA.

If you love A Family Apart, check out the rest of the series… (click to buy)

   

 

Read when the house gets quiet:

Between 1854 and 1929, so-called orphan trains ran regularly from the cities of the East Coast to the farmlands of the Midwest, carrying thousands of abandoned children whose fates would be determined by pure luck. Would they be adopted by a kind and loving family, or would they face a childhood and adolescence of hard labor and servitude?

As a young Irish immigrant, Vivian Daly was one such child, sent by rail from New York City to an uncertain future a world away. Returning east later in life, Vivian leads a quiet, peaceful existence on the coast of Maine, the memories of her upbringing rendered a hazy blur. But in her attic, hidden in trunks, are vestiges of a turbulent past.

Seventeen-year-old Molly Ayer knows that a community-service position helping an elderly widow clean out her attic is the only thing keeping her out of juvenile hall. But as Molly helps Vivian sort through her keepsakes and possessions, she discovers that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they appear. A Penobscot Indian who has spent her youth in and out of foster homes, Molly is also an outsider being raised by strangers, and she, too, has unanswered questions about the past.

Moving between contemporary Maine and Depression-era Minnesota, Orphan Train is a powerful tale of upheaval and resilience, second chances, and unexpected friendship.

(Thanks to http://www.bluewillowbookshop.com/ for the summaries!)

 

Published by

Christine Thomas Alderman

Writer, reader, educator. Read with me here and follow my writing journey at www.facebook.com/christinethomasaldermanauthor

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