Laugh, Cry, Cringe and Cheer with Memoir

Take a peek into someone’s window, it’s okay, they want you to see. Will it be a window to another world or a mirror?

In “Furiously Happy,” #1 “New York Times” bestselling author Jenny Lawson explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a “terrible” idea.

But terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.

As Jenny says”

“Some people might think that being ‘furiously happy’ is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he’s never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos.”

“Furiously Happy” is about” “taking those moments when things are fine and making them amazing, because those moments are what make us who we are, and they’re the same moments we take into battle with us when our brains declare war on our very existence. It’s the difference between “surviving life” and “living life.” It’s the difference between “taking a shower” and “teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair.” It’s the difference between being “sane” and being “furiously happy.”

Lawson is beloved around the world for her inimitable humor and honesty, and in “Furiously Happy,” she is at her snort-inducing funniest. This is a book about embracing everything that makes us who we are – the beautiful and the flawed – and then using it to find joy in fantastic and outrageous ways. Because as Jenny’s mom says, “Maybe ‘crazy’ isn’t so bad after all.” Sometimes crazy is just right.

Love it? Read more (Click to buy)

#1″NEW YORK TIMES” BESTSELLER Includes two new essays
NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY MICHIKO KAKUTANI, “THE NEW YORK TIMES ” NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY “BUZZFEED, THE GLOBE AND MAIL, “AND” LIBRARY JOURNAL”
For readers of Nora Ephron, Tina Fey, and David Sedaris, this hilarious, wise, and fiercely candid collection of personal essays establishes Lena Dunham the acclaimed creator, producer, and star of HBO’s “Girls” as one of the most original young talents writing today.
In “Not That Kind of Girl, ” Dunham illuminates the experiences that are part of making one’s way in the world: falling in love, feeling alone, being ten pounds overweight despite eating only health food, having to prove yourself in a room full of men twice your age, finding true love, and most of all, having the guts to believe that your story is one that deserves to be told.

It’s not Lena Dunham’s candor that makes me gasp. Rather, it’s her writing which is full of surprises where you least expect them. A fine, subversive book. David Sedaris
This book should be required reading for anyone who thinks they understand the experience of being a young woman in our culture. I thought I knew the author rather well, and I found many (not altogether welcome) surprises. Carroll Dunham
Witty, illuminating, maddening, bracingly bleak . . . Dunham] is a genuine artist, and a disturber of the order. “The Atlantic.

Lizz Winstead, co-creator of “The Daily Show” and one of today’s most hilarious comedians and insightful social critics, pens a brilliant account of how she discovered her comedic voice.

In this collection of autobiographical essays, Winstead vividly recounts how she fought to find her own voice, both as a comedian and as a woman, and how humor became her most powerful weapon in confronting life’s challenges.

Growing up in the Midwest, the youngest child of conservative Catholic parents, Winstead learned early in her life that the straightforward questions she posed to various authority figures around her-her parents, her parish priest, even an anti-abortion counselor -prompted many startled looks and uncomfortable silences, but few answers. Her questions rattled people because they exposed the inconsistencies and hypocrisies in the people and institutions she confronted. Yet she didn’t let that stop her from pursuing her dreams.

Funny and biting, honest and poignant, this no-holds-barred collection gives an in-depth look into the life of one of today’s most influential comic voices. In writing about her childhood longing to be a priest, her role in developing The Daily Show, and of her often problematic habit of diving into everything head first, asking questions later (resulting in multiple rescue-dog adoptions and travel disasters), Lizz Winstead has tapped an outrageous and heartfelt vein of the all-too-human comedy.

 

Thanks http://www.brazosbookstore.com/ for the summaries!

Published by

Christine Thomas Alderman

Writer, reader, educator. Read with me here and follow my writing journey at www.facebook.com/christinethomasaldermanauthor

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